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Margareta Niel

For Austrian jeweler Margareta Niel, jewelry is an object that when worn becomes an everyday companion, a “toy for the soul.” Niel is particularly drawn to the white color of silver; she is intrigued by the special character and emotional symbolism of this material, and she appreciates its physical and symbolic lightness and delicacy. When creating her jewels, Niel forms hollow bodies that are not entirely closed, and sometimes transparent objects. She focuses on texture, incorporating different nuances of light and shade, matte and shiny surfaces, and delicate engravings that are barely perceptible to the viewer. Her curving lines are soft and dynamic and appear spontaneous; she is drawn to the graphic gesture of simple drawings and especially handwriting, though the words she uses are abstractions meant to guide viewers their own experience. 

Margareta Niel

For Austrian jeweler Margareta Niel, jewelry is an object that when worn becomes an everyday companion, a “toy for the soul.” Niel is particularly drawn to the white color of silver; she is intrigued by the special character and emotional symbolism of this material, and she appreciates its physical and symbolic lightness and delicacy. When creating her jewels, Niel forms hollow bodies that are not entirely closed, and sometimes transparent objects. She focuses on texture, incorporating different nuances of light and shade, matte and shiny surfaces, and delicate engravings that are barely perceptible to the viewer. Her curving lines are soft and dynamic and appear spontaneous; she is drawn to the graphic gesture of simple drawings and especially handwriting, though the words she uses are abstractions meant to guide viewers their own experience. 

Danielle Gori-Montanelli
Designer Danielle Gori-Montanelli was born in Washington, D.C., and graduated from Sarah Lawrence College before moving to New York City to launch her career as a painter. A successful metalsmith, Gori-Montanelli “painted” her works with a handsaw, hammer, and blowtorch. However, she soon found herself making a living as a jeweler, and after having two children began to seek alternatives to the hazardous materials and methods involved in metalwork. That’s when she discovered felt. Imagining the tactile possibilities of a work is now as important a part of Gori-Montanelli’s creative process as envisioning what it will look like; her pieces evolve organically as she plays with the colors and forms of her accumulating layers. Gori-Montanelli and her family currently live in Middlebury, Vermont.

Danielle Gori-Montanelli

Designer Danielle Gori-Montanelli was born in Washington, D.C., and graduated from Sarah Lawrence College before moving to New York City to launch her career as a painter. A successful metalsmith, Gori-Montanelli “painted” her works with a handsaw, hammer, and blowtorch. However, she soon found herself making a living as a jeweler, and after having two children began to seek alternatives to the hazardous materials and methods involved in metalwork. That’s when she discovered felt. Imagining the tactile possibilities of a work is now as important a part of Gori-Montanelli’s creative process as envisioning what it will look like; her pieces evolve organically as she plays with the colors and forms of her accumulating layers. Gori-Montanelli and her family currently live in Middlebury, Vermont.

Christophe Tissot
 

 

Like Alexander Calder and Claude Lalanne, Christophe Tissot is among that handful of artists for whom making jewelry goes hand-in-hand with their principal body of work. Tissot began his painting practice in Florence in 1985, with oil paint and India ink among his preferred media. His works are characterized by large visionary and poetic formats, yet while he is familiar with the monumental, his jewels demonstrate that he is also at ease with micro-spaces. Tissot’s artist’s jewelry is fuelled by the content of his pictorial oeuvre, expressing the lines of tension, scrolls, and engravings which inform his canvases and his large India ink works. From this emerges a world of highly architectural forms, suggesting the oeuvre of a sculptor because, in the artist’s mind, most of these cuffs represent forms powerful enough to fill larger spaces.



 

Christophe Tissot

Like Alexander Calder and Claude Lalanne, Christophe Tissot is among that handful of artists for whom making jewelry goes hand-in-hand with their principal body of work. Tissot began his painting practice in Florence in 1985, with oil paint and India ink among his preferred media. His works are characterized by large visionary and poetic formats, yet while he is familiar with the monumental, his jewels demonstrate that he is also at ease with micro-spaces. Tissot’s artist’s jewelry is fuelled by the content of his pictorial oeuvre, expressing the lines of tension, scrolls, and engravings which inform his canvases and his large India ink works. From this emerges a world of highly architectural forms, suggesting the oeuvre of a sculptor because, in the artist’s mind, most of these cuffs represent forms powerful enough to fill larger spaces.

 

Begoña Rentero

Spanish designer Begoña Rentero’s creations are characterized by fantasy with a touch of glamour, because she believes that life is better with a spoonful of sugar. Rentero studied art and jewelry at the Madrid School of Art, and interior architecture in Granada. Her pieces feature bright colors and balanced forms. She works with all types of fabrics, and in her search for fresh ideas she is constantly researching new possibilities for materials and treatments: she has incorporated special paper, silk, wool, cotton, linen, felt cotton, and more into her works. She uses natural dyes, creating her own palette by mixing pigments to achieve the vibrant colors that distinguish her work. Rentero likes to make jewels that are delicate, yet somewhat tough.

Begoña Rentero

Spanish designer Begoña Rentero’s creations are characterized by fantasy with a touch of glamour, because she believes that life is better with a spoonful of sugar. Rentero studied art and jewelry at the Madrid School of Art, and interior architecture in Granada. Her pieces feature bright colors and balanced forms. She works with all types of fabrics, and in her search for fresh ideas she is constantly researching new possibilities for materials and treatments: she has incorporated special paper, silk, wool, cotton, linen, felt cotton, and more into her works. She uses natural dyes, creating her own palette by mixing pigments to achieve the vibrant colors that distinguish her work. Rentero likes to make jewels that are delicate, yet somewhat tough.

Cécile Bertrand
Born in Paris and based in Brussels, Cécile Bertrand has been creating textile jewelry since 2005. Bertrand was originally an accessories designer, and her collection of fabrics, especially silks, was her initial source of inspiration. These fabrics invited experimentation with contrasting patterns: flowers against stripes, polka dots with Italian landscapes. A self-taught jeweler, Bertrand designs through making, and the challenges she encounters along the way often lead her to new directions and unexpected outcomes. Some of her recent work makes use of touristic scarves featuring figurative scenes—she enjoys mixing these kitsch designs with different geometrically printed silks. Each of her printed “pastilles” necklaces is made in limited edition, and she also designs a “basic” collection of colorful satin necklaces made of rolled-up fabric beads. She is currently working with paper, recycling books and old maps to create one-of-a-kind pieces.

Cécile Bertrand

Born in Paris and based in Brussels, Cécile Bertrand has been creating textile jewelry since 2005. Bertrand was originally an accessories designer, and her collection of fabrics, especially silks, was her initial source of inspiration. These fabrics invited experimentation with contrasting patterns: flowers against stripes, polka dots with Italian landscapes. A self-taught jeweler, Bertrand designs through making, and the challenges she encounters along the way often lead her to new directions and unexpected outcomes. Some of her recent work makes use of touristic scarves featuring figurative scenes—she enjoys mixing these kitsch designs with different geometrically printed silks. Each of her printed “pastilles” necklaces is made in limited edition, and she also designs a “basic” collection of colorful satin necklaces made of rolled-up fabric beads. She is currently working with paper, recycling books and old maps to create one-of-a-kind pieces.

Janka Juhos
Hungarian designer Janka Juhos was born into a family of artists, and so her future career was marked out well in advance. After receiving her BFA in 2010, Juhos founded her own jewelry design company, JUJJ. JUJJ refers to the feeling of being surprised, when you suddenly realize that something that made you uncertain at first was what you’ve always been looking for. Juhos believes in the power of her materials, and their potential to express ideas and construct narratives in a witty and sophisticated way. Her jewelry seeks harmony between contemporary and traditional forms, local production and global inspiration, architectural structures and feminine lightness, repetitive shapes and the softness of the human form. For Juhos, the physical act of creating an object plays an essential role in our increasingly virtual world. Juhos is currently a graduate student at Moholy-Nagy University of Arts and Design.

Janka Juhos

Hungarian designer Janka Juhos was born into a family of artists, and so her future career was marked out well in advance. After receiving her BFA in 2010, Juhos founded her own jewelry design company, JUJJ. JUJJ refers to the feeling of being surprised, when you suddenly realize that something that made you uncertain at first was what you’ve always been looking for. Juhos believes in the power of her materials, and their potential to express ideas and construct narratives in a witty and sophisticated way. Her jewelry seeks harmony between contemporary and traditional forms, local production and global inspiration, architectural structures and feminine lightness, repetitive shapes and the softness of the human form. For Juhos, the physical act of creating an object plays an essential role in our increasingly virtual world. Juhos is currently a graduate student at Moholy-Nagy University of Arts and Design.

Milena Zu

Bali-based jeweler Milena Zu’s signature mesh jewelry is crocheted stitch by stitch with fine wires and hooks using the ancient silver-weaving technique that originated in Gujarat, India. She works with the finest strands of gold, silver, copper, brass, stainless steel, gems, semi-precious stones, crystal beads, and pearls. Zu was born and raised in Turin, and she had a passion for art from an early age. She greatly enjoyed learning to knit and crochet from her grandmother, and later studied at the art school in Turin. When Zu first arrived in Bali, she was fascinated by the local craftsmen who were crocheting traditional ornaments with metals. It was immediately clear to her that this was the very vehicle she had been looking for to manifest her unique visions. Her designs are inspired by stars and constellations, sacred geometry and numerology, and their subtle, invisible influences on human life.

Milena Zu

Bali-based jeweler Milena Zu’s signature mesh jewelry is crocheted stitch by stitch with fine wires and hooks using the ancient silver-weaving technique that originated in Gujarat, India. She works with the finest strands of gold, silver, copper, brass, stainless steel, gems, semi-precious stones, crystal beads, and pearls. Zu was born and raised in Turin, and she had a passion for art from an early age. She greatly enjoyed learning to knit and crochet from her grandmother, and later studied at the art school in Turin. When Zu first arrived in Bali, she was fascinated by the local craftsmen who were crocheting traditional ornaments with metals. It was immediately clear to her that this was the very vehicle she had been looking for to manifest her unique visions. Her designs are inspired by stars and constellations, sacred geometry and numerology, and their subtle, invisible influences on human life.

Arek Wolski

Polish designer Arek Wolski studied physical oceanography at the University of Gdansk. While a student, he “found” amber, and it was love at the first sight. After graduation, he decided to change his career path and started working as a goldsmith and designer. A completely self-taught maker, Wolski is fascinated by the duality of design, and whether it can be considered art or a commercial endeavor. In his workshop, the starting point is design, which takes up most of his time and brings him the satisfaction of making a well-designed product that is widely accepted by the public. However, for Wolski the second and most important aspect of making jewelry is to sometimes be an artist—but only when he has something significant to say.

Arek Wolski

Polish designer Arek Wolski studied physical oceanography at the University of Gdansk. While a student, he “found” amber, and it was love at the first sight. After graduation, he decided to change his career path and started working as a goldsmith and designer. A completely self-taught maker, Wolski is fascinated by the duality of design, and whether it can be considered art or a commercial endeavor. In his workshop, the starting point is design, which takes up most of his time and brings him the satisfaction of making a well-designed product that is widely accepted by the public. However, for Wolski the second and most important aspect of making jewelry is to sometimes be an artist—but only when he has something significant to say.

David and Roberta Williamson 

Pulling from the vast archives of found objects, antique prints, pressed ferns and leaves, and various ephemera that line their studio walls, artists Roberta and David Williamson create jewelry that takes us back to a kinder, gentler aesthetic. The Williamsons have worked together since they were 18, and their relationship in the studio is the same as it is elsewhere—they simply love being together. After being a couple for so many years they have come to think very much alike, and the pieces they make pass smoothly back and forth between them through their many processes. Their work frequently references the garden, a metaphor for that wonderful, creative place in their minds where they conceive new ideas. Often exploring the concept of perfection in the imperfect, they include such details as a tiny chewed insect hole in a sterling silver leaf, which make each piece come alive.

David and Roberta Williamson 

Pulling from the vast archives of found objects, antique prints, pressed ferns and leaves, and various ephemera that line their studio walls, artists Roberta and David Williamson create jewelry that takes us back to a kinder, gentler aesthetic. The Williamsons have worked together since they were 18, and their relationship in the studio is the same as it is elsewhere—they simply love being together. After being a couple for so many years they have come to think very much alike, and the pieces they make pass smoothly back and forth between them through their many processes. Their work frequently references the garden, a metaphor for that wonderful, creative place in their minds where they conceive new ideas. Often exploring the concept of perfection in the imperfect, they include such details as a tiny chewed insect hole in a sterling silver leaf, which make each piece come alive.

Jo Hayes Ward

Constructing jewelry from small building blocks, Jo Hayes Ward creates elegant pieces with an architectural aesthetic. Her designs are characterized by elements that dramatically catch the light with movement, and intricate structures that hint at geometric, mathematical, and organic references. Her jewels incorporate complex textured and patterned surfaces, reflecting light in multiple directions and giving an exquisite tonal quality to her work. Ward crafts her designs in a digital environment, using rapid prototyping technology alongside traditional jewelry-making techniques. An important aspect of her designs is to harness machine marks and exploit them as an aesthetic. This, alongside her extensive knowledge of materials and techniques, has enabled Ward to develop her unique signature as a maker of timeless, modern, pieces that come alive when worn.

Jo Hayes Ward

Constructing jewelry from small building blocks, Jo Hayes Ward creates elegant pieces with an architectural aesthetic. Her designs are characterized by elements that dramatically catch the light with movement, and intricate structures that hint at geometric, mathematical, and organic references. Her jewels incorporate complex textured and patterned surfaces, reflecting light in multiple directions and giving an exquisite tonal quality to her work. Ward crafts her designs in a digital environment, using rapid prototyping technology alongside traditional jewelry-making techniques. An important aspect of her designs is to harness machine marks and exploit them as an aesthetic. This, alongside her extensive knowledge of materials and techniques, has enabled Ward to develop her unique signature as a maker of timeless, modern, pieces that come alive when worn.

Eliana Venier

Eliana Venier studied advertising and fashion marketing before she discovered her calling as a jeweler. She created her brand, Alienina, in 2008. The name emphasizes Venier’s point of view: alien to the traditional fashion system. This handmade collection, created from poor and discarded materials, aims to extend the lifespan of everyday objects and grant them a new use and aesthetic value. Venier creates these jewels using such diverse materials as sailing and mountain-climbing cords, wicks for oil lamps, resin commonly used in car parts, and fabric and straps used for blinds. Eighty percent of the materials are production waste, washable and non-toxic. Her inspiration comes from both architecture and the natural environment: Alienina jewellery is wearable architecture with an organic touch. With Alienina, Venier hopes to inspire people to discover that objects can experience a new life with new functions.

Eliana Venier

Eliana Venier studied advertising and fashion marketing before she discovered her calling as a jeweler. She created her brand, Alienina, in 2008. The name emphasizes Venier’s point of view: alien to the traditional fashion system. This handmade collection, created from poor and discarded materials, aims to extend the lifespan of everyday objects and grant them a new use and aesthetic value. Venier creates these jewels using such diverse materials as sailing and mountain-climbing cords, wicks for oil lamps, resin commonly used in car parts, and fabric and straps used for blinds. Eighty percent of the materials are production waste, washable and non-toxic. Her inspiration comes from both architecture and the natural environment: Alienina jewellery is wearable architecture with an organic touch. With Alienina, Venier hopes to inspire people to discover that objects can experience a new life with new functions.

Violaine Ulmer

For Parisian jeweler Violaine Ulmer, the conception of a new piece of jewelry involves consideration of the interactions of light, transparency, form, and space to create a plastic object, not just an item of adornment. Each piece is above all a sculpture and a further source of experimentation. This approach gives form to “objewels” (objects-sculptures-jewelry), work that can be placed at the intersection of art, fashion, and design. Her current explorations focus on the meeting point between specific porcelain techniques and classic jewelry-making processes. Through this research, Ulmer evolves forms that exploit the fundamental character of her materials; they are both generous and pared to the essence.

Violaine Ulmer

For Parisian jeweler Violaine Ulmer, the conception of a new piece of jewelry involves consideration of the interactions of light, transparency, form, and space to create a plastic object, not just an item of adornment. Each piece is above all a sculpture and a further source of experimentation. This approach gives form to “objewels” (objects-sculptures-jewelry), work that can be placed at the intersection of art, fashion, and design. Her current explorations focus on the meeting point between specific porcelain techniques and classic jewelry-making processes. Through this research, Ulmer evolves forms that exploit the fundamental character of her materials; they are both generous and pared to the essence.

Camilla Teglio

The main theme of Camilla Teglio’s work is decoration. Her pieces include an array of textures and patterns, created using a variety of techniques and materials. In her Blue collection, Teglio combines layers of colors, paper, and patterns, melted together until they become something new. She has a particular passion for the typical motifs of Japanese paper: repetitive, blue in color, and sometimes hypnotic. She believes that wood is the perfect link between the paper and the body, and imagines her works as contemporary Ukiyo-e, the ancient printing method created during the Edo period in Japan that uses carved pieces of wood. Ukiyo-e means “pictures of the floating world:” Teglio’s “floating world” is one of signs, patterns, and drawings, floating on small pieces of wood painted in blue. Teglio studied at Alchimia school of contemporary jewelry in Florence before moving to Genoa, where she has her own studio.

Camilla Teglio

The main theme of Camilla Teglio’s work is decoration. Her pieces include an array of textures and patterns, created using a variety of techniques and materials. In her Blue collection, Teglio combines layers of colors, paper, and patterns, melted together until they become something new. She has a particular passion for the typical motifs of Japanese paper: repetitive, blue in color, and sometimes hypnotic. She believes that wood is the perfect link between the paper and the body, and imagines her works as contemporary Ukiyo-e, the ancient printing method created during the Edo period in Japan that uses carved pieces of wood. Ukiyo-e means “pictures of the floating world:” Teglio’s “floating world” is one of signs, patterns, and drawings, floating on small pieces of wood painted in blue. Teglio studied at Alchimia school of contemporary jewelry in Florence before moving to Genoa, where she has her own studio.

Eva Steinberg

Jeweler Eva Steinberg creates new jewelry using old elements. As she fashions each piece, she brings together traditional techniques, vintage ornaments, and used materials in a new order and combination; she finds that the ultimate challenge is transferring the forms and colors of nature into her works. Steinberg is greatly inspired by her travels and explorations of foreign cultures, and her most recent collection is a portrait of all the experiences that she has gathered over the past 22 years with that fascinating material, gold. She is particularly intrigued by opal-enamel, because it demands precise performance. Steinberg aims for clarity, effortlessness, playfulness, harmony of form and color, and harmony in the shimmering of the enamel combined with gold. She believes that with jewelry, we can bring to light the beauty concealed within.

Eva Steinberg

Jeweler Eva Steinberg creates new jewelry using old elements. As she fashions each piece, she brings together traditional techniques, vintage ornaments, and used materials in a new order and combination; she finds that the ultimate challenge is transferring the forms and colors of nature into her works. Steinberg is greatly inspired by her travels and explorations of foreign cultures, and her most recent collection is a portrait of all the experiences that she has gathered over the past 22 years with that fascinating material, gold. She is particularly intrigued by opal-enamel, because it demands precise performance. Steinberg aims for clarity, effortlessness, playfulness, harmony of form and color, and harmony in the shimmering of the enamel combined with gold. She believes that with jewelry, we can bring to light the beauty concealed within.

Simonetta Starrabba

Rome-based designer Simonetta Starrabba began making jewelry in 1988, when she opened an old tin box of vintage buttons. This occurrence sparked an abiding passion for these wonderful little objects, and inspired her to use her newfound artistic skills to create button jewels. Since then, Starrabba has been on the hunt for vintage buttons, with a special preference for specimens from the 1920s to 1940s because they are always unique and full of smart details. These buttons are often made from Bakelite, casein, celluloid, all kinds of plastics, glass, bone, wood, or crystal. Starrabba seeks harmony between forms and tones in her designs, and the resulting pieces are charming and marvelous, but also serious and intriguing. Her jewelry, including bracelets, brooches, earrings, rings, and cufflinks, is all one-of-a-kind.

Simonetta Starrabba

Rome-based designer Simonetta Starrabba began making jewelry in 1988, when she opened an old tin box of vintage buttons. This occurrence sparked an abiding passion for these wonderful little objects, and inspired her to use her newfound artistic skills to create button jewels. Since then, Starrabba has been on the hunt for vintage buttons, with a special preference for specimens from the 1920s to 1940s because they are always unique and full of smart details. These buttons are often made from Bakelite, casein, celluloid, all kinds of plastics, glass, bone, wood, or crystal. Starrabba seeks harmony between forms and tones in her designs, and the resulting pieces are charming and marvelous, but also serious and intriguing. Her jewelry, including bracelets, brooches, earrings, rings, and cufflinks, is all one-of-a-kind.

Margareta Niel

For Austrian jeweler Margareta Niel, jewelry is an object that when worn becomes an everyday companion, a “toy for the soul.” Niel is particularly drawn to the white color of silver; she is intrigued by the special character and emotional symbolism of this material, and she appreciates its physical and symbolic lightness and delicacy. When creating her jewels, Niel forms hollow bodies that are not entirely closed, and sometimes transparent objects. She focuses on texture, incorporating different nuances of light and shade, matte and shiny surfaces, and delicate engravings that are barely perceptible to the viewer. Her curving lines are soft and dynamic and appear spontaneous; she is drawn to the graphic gesture of simple drawings and especially handwriting, though the words she uses are abstractions meant to guide viewers their own experience. 

Margareta Niel

For Austrian jeweler Margareta Niel, jewelry is an object that when worn becomes an everyday companion, a “toy for the soul.” Niel is particularly drawn to the white color of silver; she is intrigued by the special character and emotional symbolism of this material, and she appreciates its physical and symbolic lightness and delicacy. When creating her jewels, Niel forms hollow bodies that are not entirely closed, and sometimes transparent objects. She focuses on texture, incorporating different nuances of light and shade, matte and shiny surfaces, and delicate engravings that are barely perceptible to the viewer. Her curving lines are soft and dynamic and appear spontaneous; she is drawn to the graphic gesture of simple drawings and especially handwriting, though the words she uses are abstractions meant to guide viewers their own experience. 

Danielle Gori-Montanelli
Designer Danielle Gori-Montanelli was born in Washington, D.C., and graduated from Sarah Lawrence College before moving to New York City to launch her career as a painter. A successful metalsmith, Gori-Montanelli “painted” her works with a handsaw, hammer, and blowtorch. However, she soon found herself making a living as a jeweler, and after having two children began to seek alternatives to the hazardous materials and methods involved in metalwork. That’s when she discovered felt. Imagining the tactile possibilities of a work is now as important a part of Gori-Montanelli’s creative process as envisioning what it will look like; her pieces evolve organically as she plays with the colors and forms of her accumulating layers. Gori-Montanelli and her family currently live in Middlebury, Vermont.

Danielle Gori-Montanelli

Designer Danielle Gori-Montanelli was born in Washington, D.C., and graduated from Sarah Lawrence College before moving to New York City to launch her career as a painter. A successful metalsmith, Gori-Montanelli “painted” her works with a handsaw, hammer, and blowtorch. However, she soon found herself making a living as a jeweler, and after having two children began to seek alternatives to the hazardous materials and methods involved in metalwork. That’s when she discovered felt. Imagining the tactile possibilities of a work is now as important a part of Gori-Montanelli’s creative process as envisioning what it will look like; her pieces evolve organically as she plays with the colors and forms of her accumulating layers. Gori-Montanelli and her family currently live in Middlebury, Vermont.

Christophe Tissot
 

 

Like Alexander Calder and Claude Lalanne, Christophe Tissot is among that handful of artists for whom making jewelry goes hand-in-hand with their principal body of work. Tissot began his painting practice in Florence in 1985, with oil paint and India ink among his preferred media. His works are characterized by large visionary and poetic formats, yet while he is familiar with the monumental, his jewels demonstrate that he is also at ease with micro-spaces. Tissot’s artist’s jewelry is fuelled by the content of his pictorial oeuvre, expressing the lines of tension, scrolls, and engravings which inform his canvases and his large India ink works. From this emerges a world of highly architectural forms, suggesting the oeuvre of a sculptor because, in the artist’s mind, most of these cuffs represent forms powerful enough to fill larger spaces.



 

Christophe Tissot

Like Alexander Calder and Claude Lalanne, Christophe Tissot is among that handful of artists for whom making jewelry goes hand-in-hand with their principal body of work. Tissot began his painting practice in Florence in 1985, with oil paint and India ink among his preferred media. His works are characterized by large visionary and poetic formats, yet while he is familiar with the monumental, his jewels demonstrate that he is also at ease with micro-spaces. Tissot’s artist’s jewelry is fuelled by the content of his pictorial oeuvre, expressing the lines of tension, scrolls, and engravings which inform his canvases and his large India ink works. From this emerges a world of highly architectural forms, suggesting the oeuvre of a sculptor because, in the artist’s mind, most of these cuffs represent forms powerful enough to fill larger spaces.

 

Begoña Rentero

Spanish designer Begoña Rentero’s creations are characterized by fantasy with a touch of glamour, because she believes that life is better with a spoonful of sugar. Rentero studied art and jewelry at the Madrid School of Art, and interior architecture in Granada. Her pieces feature bright colors and balanced forms. She works with all types of fabrics, and in her search for fresh ideas she is constantly researching new possibilities for materials and treatments: she has incorporated special paper, silk, wool, cotton, linen, felt cotton, and more into her works. She uses natural dyes, creating her own palette by mixing pigments to achieve the vibrant colors that distinguish her work. Rentero likes to make jewels that are delicate, yet somewhat tough.

Begoña Rentero

Spanish designer Begoña Rentero’s creations are characterized by fantasy with a touch of glamour, because she believes that life is better with a spoonful of sugar. Rentero studied art and jewelry at the Madrid School of Art, and interior architecture in Granada. Her pieces feature bright colors and balanced forms. She works with all types of fabrics, and in her search for fresh ideas she is constantly researching new possibilities for materials and treatments: she has incorporated special paper, silk, wool, cotton, linen, felt cotton, and more into her works. She uses natural dyes, creating her own palette by mixing pigments to achieve the vibrant colors that distinguish her work. Rentero likes to make jewels that are delicate, yet somewhat tough.

Cécile Bertrand
Born in Paris and based in Brussels, Cécile Bertrand has been creating textile jewelry since 2005. Bertrand was originally an accessories designer, and her collection of fabrics, especially silks, was her initial source of inspiration. These fabrics invited experimentation with contrasting patterns: flowers against stripes, polka dots with Italian landscapes. A self-taught jeweler, Bertrand designs through making, and the challenges she encounters along the way often lead her to new directions and unexpected outcomes. Some of her recent work makes use of touristic scarves featuring figurative scenes—she enjoys mixing these kitsch designs with different geometrically printed silks. Each of her printed “pastilles” necklaces is made in limited edition, and she also designs a “basic” collection of colorful satin necklaces made of rolled-up fabric beads. She is currently working with paper, recycling books and old maps to create one-of-a-kind pieces.

Cécile Bertrand

Born in Paris and based in Brussels, Cécile Bertrand has been creating textile jewelry since 2005. Bertrand was originally an accessories designer, and her collection of fabrics, especially silks, was her initial source of inspiration. These fabrics invited experimentation with contrasting patterns: flowers against stripes, polka dots with Italian landscapes. A self-taught jeweler, Bertrand designs through making, and the challenges she encounters along the way often lead her to new directions and unexpected outcomes. Some of her recent work makes use of touristic scarves featuring figurative scenes—she enjoys mixing these kitsch designs with different geometrically printed silks. Each of her printed “pastilles” necklaces is made in limited edition, and she also designs a “basic” collection of colorful satin necklaces made of rolled-up fabric beads. She is currently working with paper, recycling books and old maps to create one-of-a-kind pieces.

Janka Juhos
Hungarian designer Janka Juhos was born into a family of artists, and so her future career was marked out well in advance. After receiving her BFA in 2010, Juhos founded her own jewelry design company, JUJJ. JUJJ refers to the feeling of being surprised, when you suddenly realize that something that made you uncertain at first was what you’ve always been looking for. Juhos believes in the power of her materials, and their potential to express ideas and construct narratives in a witty and sophisticated way. Her jewelry seeks harmony between contemporary and traditional forms, local production and global inspiration, architectural structures and feminine lightness, repetitive shapes and the softness of the human form. For Juhos, the physical act of creating an object plays an essential role in our increasingly virtual world. Juhos is currently a graduate student at Moholy-Nagy University of Arts and Design.

Janka Juhos

Hungarian designer Janka Juhos was born into a family of artists, and so her future career was marked out well in advance. After receiving her BFA in 2010, Juhos founded her own jewelry design company, JUJJ. JUJJ refers to the feeling of being surprised, when you suddenly realize that something that made you uncertain at first was what you’ve always been looking for. Juhos believes in the power of her materials, and their potential to express ideas and construct narratives in a witty and sophisticated way. Her jewelry seeks harmony between contemporary and traditional forms, local production and global inspiration, architectural structures and feminine lightness, repetitive shapes and the softness of the human form. For Juhos, the physical act of creating an object plays an essential role in our increasingly virtual world. Juhos is currently a graduate student at Moholy-Nagy University of Arts and Design.

Milena Zu

Bali-based jeweler Milena Zu’s signature mesh jewelry is crocheted stitch by stitch with fine wires and hooks using the ancient silver-weaving technique that originated in Gujarat, India. She works with the finest strands of gold, silver, copper, brass, stainless steel, gems, semi-precious stones, crystal beads, and pearls. Zu was born and raised in Turin, and she had a passion for art from an early age. She greatly enjoyed learning to knit and crochet from her grandmother, and later studied at the art school in Turin. When Zu first arrived in Bali, she was fascinated by the local craftsmen who were crocheting traditional ornaments with metals. It was immediately clear to her that this was the very vehicle she had been looking for to manifest her unique visions. Her designs are inspired by stars and constellations, sacred geometry and numerology, and their subtle, invisible influences on human life.

Milena Zu

Bali-based jeweler Milena Zu’s signature mesh jewelry is crocheted stitch by stitch with fine wires and hooks using the ancient silver-weaving technique that originated in Gujarat, India. She works with the finest strands of gold, silver, copper, brass, stainless steel, gems, semi-precious stones, crystal beads, and pearls. Zu was born and raised in Turin, and she had a passion for art from an early age. She greatly enjoyed learning to knit and crochet from her grandmother, and later studied at the art school in Turin. When Zu first arrived in Bali, she was fascinated by the local craftsmen who were crocheting traditional ornaments with metals. It was immediately clear to her that this was the very vehicle she had been looking for to manifest her unique visions. Her designs are inspired by stars and constellations, sacred geometry and numerology, and their subtle, invisible influences on human life.

Arek Wolski

Polish designer Arek Wolski studied physical oceanography at the University of Gdansk. While a student, he “found” amber, and it was love at the first sight. After graduation, he decided to change his career path and started working as a goldsmith and designer. A completely self-taught maker, Wolski is fascinated by the duality of design, and whether it can be considered art or a commercial endeavor. In his workshop, the starting point is design, which takes up most of his time and brings him the satisfaction of making a well-designed product that is widely accepted by the public. However, for Wolski the second and most important aspect of making jewelry is to sometimes be an artist—but only when he has something significant to say.

Arek Wolski

Polish designer Arek Wolski studied physical oceanography at the University of Gdansk. While a student, he “found” amber, and it was love at the first sight. After graduation, he decided to change his career path and started working as a goldsmith and designer. A completely self-taught maker, Wolski is fascinated by the duality of design, and whether it can be considered art or a commercial endeavor. In his workshop, the starting point is design, which takes up most of his time and brings him the satisfaction of making a well-designed product that is widely accepted by the public. However, for Wolski the second and most important aspect of making jewelry is to sometimes be an artist—but only when he has something significant to say.

David and Roberta Williamson 

Pulling from the vast archives of found objects, antique prints, pressed ferns and leaves, and various ephemera that line their studio walls, artists Roberta and David Williamson create jewelry that takes us back to a kinder, gentler aesthetic. The Williamsons have worked together since they were 18, and their relationship in the studio is the same as it is elsewhere—they simply love being together. After being a couple for so many years they have come to think very much alike, and the pieces they make pass smoothly back and forth between them through their many processes. Their work frequently references the garden, a metaphor for that wonderful, creative place in their minds where they conceive new ideas. Often exploring the concept of perfection in the imperfect, they include such details as a tiny chewed insect hole in a sterling silver leaf, which make each piece come alive.

David and Roberta Williamson 

Pulling from the vast archives of found objects, antique prints, pressed ferns and leaves, and various ephemera that line their studio walls, artists Roberta and David Williamson create jewelry that takes us back to a kinder, gentler aesthetic. The Williamsons have worked together since they were 18, and their relationship in the studio is the same as it is elsewhere—they simply love being together. After being a couple for so many years they have come to think very much alike, and the pieces they make pass smoothly back and forth between them through their many processes. Their work frequently references the garden, a metaphor for that wonderful, creative place in their minds where they conceive new ideas. Often exploring the concept of perfection in the imperfect, they include such details as a tiny chewed insect hole in a sterling silver leaf, which make each piece come alive.

Jo Hayes Ward

Constructing jewelry from small building blocks, Jo Hayes Ward creates elegant pieces with an architectural aesthetic. Her designs are characterized by elements that dramatically catch the light with movement, and intricate structures that hint at geometric, mathematical, and organic references. Her jewels incorporate complex textured and patterned surfaces, reflecting light in multiple directions and giving an exquisite tonal quality to her work. Ward crafts her designs in a digital environment, using rapid prototyping technology alongside traditional jewelry-making techniques. An important aspect of her designs is to harness machine marks and exploit them as an aesthetic. This, alongside her extensive knowledge of materials and techniques, has enabled Ward to develop her unique signature as a maker of timeless, modern, pieces that come alive when worn.

Jo Hayes Ward

Constructing jewelry from small building blocks, Jo Hayes Ward creates elegant pieces with an architectural aesthetic. Her designs are characterized by elements that dramatically catch the light with movement, and intricate structures that hint at geometric, mathematical, and organic references. Her jewels incorporate complex textured and patterned surfaces, reflecting light in multiple directions and giving an exquisite tonal quality to her work. Ward crafts her designs in a digital environment, using rapid prototyping technology alongside traditional jewelry-making techniques. An important aspect of her designs is to harness machine marks and exploit them as an aesthetic. This, alongside her extensive knowledge of materials and techniques, has enabled Ward to develop her unique signature as a maker of timeless, modern, pieces that come alive when worn.

Eliana Venier

Eliana Venier studied advertising and fashion marketing before she discovered her calling as a jeweler. She created her brand, Alienina, in 2008. The name emphasizes Venier’s point of view: alien to the traditional fashion system. This handmade collection, created from poor and discarded materials, aims to extend the lifespan of everyday objects and grant them a new use and aesthetic value. Venier creates these jewels using such diverse materials as sailing and mountain-climbing cords, wicks for oil lamps, resin commonly used in car parts, and fabric and straps used for blinds. Eighty percent of the materials are production waste, washable and non-toxic. Her inspiration comes from both architecture and the natural environment: Alienina jewellery is wearable architecture with an organic touch. With Alienina, Venier hopes to inspire people to discover that objects can experience a new life with new functions.

Eliana Venier

Eliana Venier studied advertising and fashion marketing before she discovered her calling as a jeweler. She created her brand, Alienina, in 2008. The name emphasizes Venier’s point of view: alien to the traditional fashion system. This handmade collection, created from poor and discarded materials, aims to extend the lifespan of everyday objects and grant them a new use and aesthetic value. Venier creates these jewels using such diverse materials as sailing and mountain-climbing cords, wicks for oil lamps, resin commonly used in car parts, and fabric and straps used for blinds. Eighty percent of the materials are production waste, washable and non-toxic. Her inspiration comes from both architecture and the natural environment: Alienina jewellery is wearable architecture with an organic touch. With Alienina, Venier hopes to inspire people to discover that objects can experience a new life with new functions.

Violaine Ulmer

For Parisian jeweler Violaine Ulmer, the conception of a new piece of jewelry involves consideration of the interactions of light, transparency, form, and space to create a plastic object, not just an item of adornment. Each piece is above all a sculpture and a further source of experimentation. This approach gives form to “objewels” (objects-sculptures-jewelry), work that can be placed at the intersection of art, fashion, and design. Her current explorations focus on the meeting point between specific porcelain techniques and classic jewelry-making processes. Through this research, Ulmer evolves forms that exploit the fundamental character of her materials; they are both generous and pared to the essence.

Violaine Ulmer

For Parisian jeweler Violaine Ulmer, the conception of a new piece of jewelry involves consideration of the interactions of light, transparency, form, and space to create a plastic object, not just an item of adornment. Each piece is above all a sculpture and a further source of experimentation. This approach gives form to “objewels” (objects-sculptures-jewelry), work that can be placed at the intersection of art, fashion, and design. Her current explorations focus on the meeting point between specific porcelain techniques and classic jewelry-making processes. Through this research, Ulmer evolves forms that exploit the fundamental character of her materials; they are both generous and pared to the essence.

Camilla Teglio

The main theme of Camilla Teglio’s work is decoration. Her pieces include an array of textures and patterns, created using a variety of techniques and materials. In her Blue collection, Teglio combines layers of colors, paper, and patterns, melted together until they become something new. She has a particular passion for the typical motifs of Japanese paper: repetitive, blue in color, and sometimes hypnotic. She believes that wood is the perfect link between the paper and the body, and imagines her works as contemporary Ukiyo-e, the ancient printing method created during the Edo period in Japan that uses carved pieces of wood. Ukiyo-e means “pictures of the floating world:” Teglio’s “floating world” is one of signs, patterns, and drawings, floating on small pieces of wood painted in blue. Teglio studied at Alchimia school of contemporary jewelry in Florence before moving to Genoa, where she has her own studio.

Camilla Teglio

The main theme of Camilla Teglio’s work is decoration. Her pieces include an array of textures and patterns, created using a variety of techniques and materials. In her Blue collection, Teglio combines layers of colors, paper, and patterns, melted together until they become something new. She has a particular passion for the typical motifs of Japanese paper: repetitive, blue in color, and sometimes hypnotic. She believes that wood is the perfect link between the paper and the body, and imagines her works as contemporary Ukiyo-e, the ancient printing method created during the Edo period in Japan that uses carved pieces of wood. Ukiyo-e means “pictures of the floating world:” Teglio’s “floating world” is one of signs, patterns, and drawings, floating on small pieces of wood painted in blue. Teglio studied at Alchimia school of contemporary jewelry in Florence before moving to Genoa, where she has her own studio.

Eva Steinberg

Jeweler Eva Steinberg creates new jewelry using old elements. As she fashions each piece, she brings together traditional techniques, vintage ornaments, and used materials in a new order and combination; she finds that the ultimate challenge is transferring the forms and colors of nature into her works. Steinberg is greatly inspired by her travels and explorations of foreign cultures, and her most recent collection is a portrait of all the experiences that she has gathered over the past 22 years with that fascinating material, gold. She is particularly intrigued by opal-enamel, because it demands precise performance. Steinberg aims for clarity, effortlessness, playfulness, harmony of form and color, and harmony in the shimmering of the enamel combined with gold. She believes that with jewelry, we can bring to light the beauty concealed within.

Eva Steinberg

Jeweler Eva Steinberg creates new jewelry using old elements. As she fashions each piece, she brings together traditional techniques, vintage ornaments, and used materials in a new order and combination; she finds that the ultimate challenge is transferring the forms and colors of nature into her works. Steinberg is greatly inspired by her travels and explorations of foreign cultures, and her most recent collection is a portrait of all the experiences that she has gathered over the past 22 years with that fascinating material, gold. She is particularly intrigued by opal-enamel, because it demands precise performance. Steinberg aims for clarity, effortlessness, playfulness, harmony of form and color, and harmony in the shimmering of the enamel combined with gold. She believes that with jewelry, we can bring to light the beauty concealed within.

Simonetta Starrabba

Rome-based designer Simonetta Starrabba began making jewelry in 1988, when she opened an old tin box of vintage buttons. This occurrence sparked an abiding passion for these wonderful little objects, and inspired her to use her newfound artistic skills to create button jewels. Since then, Starrabba has been on the hunt for vintage buttons, with a special preference for specimens from the 1920s to 1940s because they are always unique and full of smart details. These buttons are often made from Bakelite, casein, celluloid, all kinds of plastics, glass, bone, wood, or crystal. Starrabba seeks harmony between forms and tones in her designs, and the resulting pieces are charming and marvelous, but also serious and intriguing. Her jewelry, including bracelets, brooches, earrings, rings, and cufflinks, is all one-of-a-kind.

Simonetta Starrabba

Rome-based designer Simonetta Starrabba began making jewelry in 1988, when she opened an old tin box of vintage buttons. This occurrence sparked an abiding passion for these wonderful little objects, and inspired her to use her newfound artistic skills to create button jewels. Since then, Starrabba has been on the hunt for vintage buttons, with a special preference for specimens from the 1920s to 1940s because they are always unique and full of smart details. These buttons are often made from Bakelite, casein, celluloid, all kinds of plastics, glass, bone, wood, or crystal. Starrabba seeks harmony between forms and tones in her designs, and the resulting pieces are charming and marvelous, but also serious and intriguing. Her jewelry, including bracelets, brooches, earrings, rings, and cufflinks, is all one-of-a-kind.

About:

The Museum of Arts and Design will present LOOT 2013: MAD about Jewelry, its curated exhibition and sale of artist-made jewelry for four days this October. Now in its 13th edition, LOOT: MAD about Jewelry has become known as the ultimate pop-up shop for contemporary art and studio jewelry by both artists and collectors alike; it affords the public the rare opportunity to acquire pieces directly from some of the most innovative jewelry artists in the world. This year, the creations of more than 50 emerging and acclaimed jewelry artists will be on sale. Prices will range from $200 to $12,000, with $1000 the average. Proceeds from the selling show will benefit the Museum’s exhibition and education programs.

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